Why doesn’t DiMarzio have any “named” pickup winders

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Offline BluesJam

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Re: Why doesn’t DiMarzio have any “named” pickup winders
« Reply #15 on: August 04, 2021, 04:31:17 AM »
Whatever the pickup recipe is, the duplication of the coil cannot be exactly replicated by a human.  I’m sure DiMarzio and Duncan have computers that replicates the wind counts, scattering, and tension of every pickup for consistency.  Since every pickups output has advertised tolerances must be very exacting.  Maybe that is why DiMarzio only names the designers but not the winders.  The EVH article on the making of his pickups is quite good read.

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Offline Guitar74

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Re: Why doesn’t DiMarzio have any “named” pickup winders
« Reply #16 on: August 04, 2021, 04:14:14 PM »
" I think they were for Robbin Crosby from Ratt"

That was some time ago.
If you're having one of those days where everyone is on your case and is just getting on your nerves, it's probably not everyone else

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Offline BluesJam

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Re: Why doesn’t DiMarzio have any “named” pickup winders
« Reply #17 on: August 25, 2021, 02:34:39 AM »
Excerpt from Premier Guitar on hand wound vs machine wound. “ In the early days of our instrument, pickups­ were wound by hand. They did have a motor to rotate the bobbin, but there was always a person standing next to the machine, guiding the wire by hand, which would lead to less consistent or loose windings, while an automated machine keeps tension and density constant. Handwound pickups are also called scatterwound, as the wires often crisscross diagonally over the bobbin. The theoretical result would be a slightly higher resistance, since more wire is used, and, thus, a minimally lower inductance and capacitance, but the differences are rather marginal since the lower density can lead to parts of the wiring being farther away from the stronger field. Practically, all these differences are hard to measure, and there should not be an inherent difference between handwound and machine-wound pickups.”